Seven months with an electric vehicle

We have now owned our 2014 Nissan Leaf all-electric vehicle for about seven months. Here are some stats and reflections.

  • We’ve driven it 3,474 miles.
  • The car has used just slightly over 1,428 kWh. This is missing the few kWhs I put in at the dealership charger and a very few other locations which I did not record. A breakdown of energy delivered by charging level follows:
    • Level 1: 1,071 kWhs (mostly from the 110 volt outlet next to our driveway)
    • Level 2: 334 kWhs (all from Chargepoint public charging locations, which seem to dominate the Twin Cities market)
    • DC fast charging: 24 kWhs (almost all from Greenlots chargers, which are the most common in the Twin Cities)
  • All that energy cost us $183, or about $0.05/mile. A 2014 Nissan Sentra averaging 30 mpg in the city would have used $253 worth of gas at today’s super low gas prices (plus another $20-$50 for one oil change). Judging from used car ads, our purchase price would have been about the same as the used Leaf. So over seven months, we’ve saved about $100 is gas and maintenance.
  • Using Xcel Energy figures, driving the Leaf compared to the Sentra avoided 1,051 lbs of CO². It basically halved the greenhouse gas emissions associated with driving our car, the second largest source of emissions from a typical household.

Our driving habits haven’t changed much, although we take the other car if we’re venturing beyond the 394/494 ring in the winter. If you turn “eco” mode off, acceleration is impressive. Lots of people ask “is that car really just electric?” If Xcel Energy ever approves a sensible metering plan for electric vehicles, we could cut our charging costs over the same time period down to about $100, or almost half of what we paid the last seven months.

What are the upstream impacts of internal combustion and electric vehicles?

My previous post comparing the nitrogen oxide emissions of electric and fossil-powered vehicles generated a number of comments (via social media and the blog) to the effect of:

“Power plants may be dirty, but you’re leaving out the upstream impact of refining the fossil fuels to power an ICE vehicle!”

That I did. It was only an analysis of (mostly) local NOx emissions, either from the car’s tailpipe, or the power plant used to generate the electricity (in MInnesota). NOx emissions can have significant local health impacts (inhalation, formation of ozone and smog, etc), but they can also travel long distances. Lifecycle or upstream impacts are also important to consider since we shouldn’t only be concerned about the local air quality impact of our transportation choices.

In an attempt to respond to these comments, I went digging for information on the upstream NOx impacts of the different vehicle fuels discussed in the post (electricity, gasoline and diesel).

The best, most usable, resource I found was the National Energy Technology Laboratory’s Upstream Dashboard Tool (NETL is part of the US Department of Energy). The UDT is “a fast and easy to use tool to determine the environmental profile of various energy feedstocks” according to the documentation. It includes emissions impact information on various “upstream” portions of energy fuels acquisition like raw material acquisition (mining or drilling), raw material transport (the truck, train or pipeline trip fuels must make before they are used) and the “energy conversion facility” (in the case of gas and diesel, this means the refinery process). Basically, you tell it to look at a fuel, and it will give you outputs like air and water emissions, solid waste generation, and water and land use requirements. And it’s all in an easy-to-use excel spreadsheet, just like they advertised!

This tool allowed me to look at the “upstream” impact of the coal and natural gas used in Minnesota’s power plants (to “fuel” an EV), and gasoline and diesel which would be used in ICE vehicles. So now I can answer the question: how do the fuels of ICE and electric vehicles used in Minnesota compare to each other in terms of NOx emissions, accounting for both the “tailpipe” emissions and the upstream emissions?

The upstream emissions

Here are the results from the Dashboard, translated into grams of NOx pollution per mile of vehicle travel:

UpstreamNOx

The Tesla is in fact cleaner in terms of upstream emissions (before the creation of any kWh sent to the electric grid) – responsible for one third as much upstream NOx as either an average gas vehicle or one select diesel vehicle (without a defeat device). This is assuming Minnesota’s electricity mix, which includes 50 percent coal and about 14 percent natural gas. The tesla has no “energy conversion facility” emissions equivalent to a refinery for the liquid fuels, since I’m counting the burning of the coal as part of the downstream emissions.

So, extracting and refining liquid fossil fuels is in fact dirtier (in terms of NOx pollutants) than the extracting and transporting the fuel for an electric vehicle (powered from roughly 75 percent fossil fuels).

The complete picture

Now let’s take a look at the whole picture: from extraction to turning wheels. Here are the results with the downstream emissions included:

LifecycleNOx

Electricity production in Minnesota is responsible for 1.4 pounds of NOx pollution per MWh, meaning an electric vehicle like the Tesla produces 0.21 grams of NOx per mile driven. With Minnesota’s current electricity generation mix, an EV is responsible for emitting about 30 percent more NOx “well to wheels” than typical gasoline vehicle, and 50 percent more than a diesel vehicle.

Electric vehicles can be better for NOx, if we kick coal

NOx rates change significantly based on the amount of coal in the electricity mix. In Oregon, which only gets 6 percent of its electricity from coal (and 32 percent from natural gas), the lifecycle NOx emissions of an EV like the Tesla would be 20 percent lower than an average gasoline vehicle. In Washington, where 75 percent of electricity comes from hyrdopower or other renewables, emissions would be less than half of a gas vehicle. In Wyoming, where 89 percent of electricity generation comes from coal, an EV would emit 80 percent more NOx per mile than a gasoline vehicle on a lifecycle basis. The United States as a whole emits 1.2 lbs of NOx per MWh, translating into a lifecycle per mile emissions rate for an EV that is about 10 percent higher than a gasoline vehicle.

Some Minnesota utilities are on a trajectory to reduce their coal use. However, there is an active political discussion going on right now about the future of coal-fired electricity in Minnesota, and the outcome is uncertain. As I said in the previous post, I think we need to electrify the transport sector to reduce climate risks. However, the choice cannot be between deploying electric vehicles or cleaning up the grid, both must be done simultaneously.

Notes

  1. If you’d like to check my math, here is the spreadsheet.
  2. This is still not a full supply-chain analysis, which would account for things like the mining of materials used to build EV batteries and car parts. This is just an analysis of fuels.
  3. Liquid fossil fuels, like gasoline, are getting dirtier over time, measured by carbon impacts, with the addition of new sources like tar sands. The UDT is based on national average compositions for gasoline, so the impact on pollutants like NOx is unclear using this approach. Regardless, electricity still needs to get a lot cleaner.

How many battery-electric vehicles are there in Minnesota?

Inspired by a previous post, I wondered how many battery-electric vehicles (cars that run on just batteries, not hybrids with plugs) there are in Minnesota. This information is not readily available from the DMV. But combining this data and this data from DOE yields an answer as of 2014: 644.

Count of Battery Electric Vehicles in the US by State - 2014

View a larger map.

Is a Tesla cleaner than a dirty diesel?

If you are a Minnesota driver, the answer is yes, but not by much it would not meet federal emissions standards for light duty vehicles. Including energy generation, a Tesla will produce slightly far fewer NOx emissions per mile than a “defeated” VW. But a Tesla in Minnesota is far three times dirtier, in terms of NOx emissions, than the average car on the road, or than federal emissions standards allow for light duty vehicles.

(I was kind of surprised by these results. If you think f I’m missing something here, let me know and I’ll make corrections to calculations and notes, as appropriate.)

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Tesla is running this ad, apparently (UPDATE: this may not be an ad, but may have been produced by that twitter user. If you know the source, let me know), and Elon Musk says cars should be tested at random to see if they meet emissions requirements. This is in response to the Volkswagen Scandal.

It’s fairly clear at this point, that in many locations with cleaner electricity sources, EVs have a carbon benefit over ICE vehicles (this EPA calculator gives you results for your area). Minnesota is one of those places, even though our electricity still comes mostly from fossil fuels.

chart (3)

But what about nitrogen oxide (NOx), the pollutant at the heart of the VW Scandal? (Here’s a rundown of the bad stuff NOx does to things that breath air) A VW with a “defeat device” could emit up to 35 times the federal emissions limits for NOx. That could be as high as 2.45 grams or 0.0054 pounds per mile. So how does an EV, like the Tesla, compare?

A Tesla uses 33 kWh for every 100 miles traveled (or 0.33 kWh per mile). According to federal statistics, Minnesota power plants emit 1.4 pounds of NOx pollution for each MWh of electricity generated (Xcel Energy shows a similar 1.5 lbs/MWh in its reporting). That means a Tesla is responsible for 0.210 grams of NOx per mile. So, to fact check the ad: yes, driving a Tesla (in Minnesota) is slightly quite a bit cleaner than a diesel VW with a defeat device.

However, that Minnesota Tesla is responsible for emitting 1.5 times more NOx per mile than the dirtiest cars allowed on the road by federal emissions standards, and 3 times more NOx per mile than the allowable fleet average NOx emissions. So it’s too early for Tesla owners to get smug about their impact on the environment. In fact, they are squarely in dirty-diesel territory. (UPDATE: my math was off in the preceding calculation, it has been corrected). You might interpret that ad another way: Tesla has actually defeated emissions testing – by moving the tailpipe from the car to a distant power plant (UPDATE: again, not sure this is a real ad).

Electric vehicles can be better for NOx – if we kick coal

If you were driving a Tesla in Washington State, which has a NOx emissions rate of 0.3 lbs/MWh, you’d actually be emitting 35 percent less NOx per mile than the average light duty vehicle. Why? Because Washington residents get most of their electricity from emissions-free hydropower.

The break-even point seems to be 0.46 pounds of NOx/MWh, which is about equal to the emissions rate for the state of Oregon. This is what their electricity sources look like:

chart (4)

Oregon only gets 6 percent of its electricity from coal. Minnesota is currently at 50 percent. It’s clear what we need to do to make EVs cleaner: reduce Minnesota’s use of coal for making electricity.

We probably need to electrify transportation to meet the State’s aggressive climate action goals. However, we don’t want to just trade carbon benefits for dirtier air and all the associated impacts (asthma, deaths). We need to simultaneously begin the transition to electric vehicles, AND rapidly decarbonize and de-coal our electricity grid.

Notes

  1. Brendan Jordan asserts via twitter that 50 percent of Minnesota EV owners use wind power for their EV charging. This means they either buy, or their utility supplies, wind “credits” to supply the amount of electricity they use for EV charging. If the credit tracking system works, this wind is “additional”, and does in fact reduce emissions. If it’s true (I haven’t seen the data) that’s great, and just another argument for decarbonizing the whole grid. However, this is not the “default” when you plug your vehicle into a charging station at home or at work. Also free wind for EV charging is not offered by Xcel Energy, Minnesota’s largest utility.

St. Paul’s electric vehicle charging stations

St. Paul has a nice video introducing their electric vehicle charging infrastructure.  According to a presentation I saw at MNAPA, the City hopes to have 150 public stations available by 2015.  They also estimated that the cost for installation was anywhere between $850 in parking ramps to $6,000 in on-street spaces.