Tag Archives: energy

November solar doldrums

cloud gif

I made this gif of visible satellite imagery from the NOAA’s Geostationary Satellite Image Archives. It basically shows cloud cover over the last 12 days at about 1 pm (19:15 zulu) each afternoon. This is a high-tech way of saying we’ve barely seen the sun for the last two weeks.

The implications for my 300 watt off-grid solar project are that almost nothing is being produced, and I’m not running anything from the batteries. With no sun in the forecast, I’m concerned about them sitting at a low stage of charge for days (or weeks at this point), which can reduce the life of lead-acid batteries.

In Minnesota in the winter, solar needs a backup, or at least a supplement. It’s great to have a grid. If I were truly off-grid, I would need some other kind of backup unless I was willing to significantly overbuild batteries or panels.

The view from the roof of the Minneapolis Convention Center, which holds a 600 kW solar PV system

How much energy could Minneapolis get from solar?

Solar PV seems to be the current darling of the renewable energy world.  But how much “resource” is really out there?  How much should cities rely on the development of local solar resources to meet their climate and energy goals?  What trade-offs should urban cities make between desirable things like tree canopy and maximizing solar energy resources?  GIS tools and new data resources can help begin to answer that question.

Counties and states are beginning to produce LiDAR data more regularly, which provides the building block information needed to analyze solar resources on buildings and elsewhere (see my previous post for a brief intro to LiDAR, or see here).  Minnesota happens to have LiDAR for the whole state, and Minneapolis has a climate action goal that references local renewable development, so I’ll focus there.

So how much solar electric potential does Minneapolis have?  Enough to supply 773,000 megawatt-hours (MWHs) each year, at the upper bound.  That would mean covering every piece of rooftop with good sun exposure and appropriate pitch (southeast to southwest facing or flat) with the best modern PV panels.  It would also mean solar installations on 68,351 structures, consisting of over 2.3 million individual panels. Continue reading How much energy could Minneapolis get from solar?

100 days of solar

100dayssolar
Watt hours to the battery, first 100 days

Today I noticed that my solar charge controller has been running for 100 days (it logs this among many other data points).  Here are some highlights from the first 100 days:

  • The system has produced 32 kWhs from two 100-watt panels.  This is roughly 2% of the total electricity consumption we saw over the same period last year.
  • Converting from DC current to AC current at low wattages is wildly inefficient.  I usually run the wifi router and cable modem continuously off the battery and I lose about 40% of my produced energy to the inverter.  It is much happier running closer to its peak (1000 watts).  We should probably convert to DC.
  • Something happened to my charge controller settings when I converted to 24 volts.  Although the controller was still charging, I lost about 10 days worth of data (hence the gap in the chart) and wasn’t able to communicate with it over that time.  A firmware reboot fixed this.
  • Although very cold, clear days are when the panels perform their best, the sun just doesn’t shine for that long each day in January and February in Minnesota.  The panels being on the ground doesn’t help either.  Just from the middle of March to the middle of April I’ve about doubled my daily output.
  • All that said, this chart doesn’t really show total potential of the panels on a given day.  If I didn’t use much of the battery the day before, panel production the next day was curtailed by the controller to avoid overcharging the battery.  I’m trying to match the loads I put on the battery with the “capacity” of the season, but that’s sometimes tricky.
  • I recently learned we were accepted into the Minnesota solar rebate program for 2014!  So with the help of a friendly solar installer, we should have a 2.8 kW grid-tied system installed sometime this year. Along with the grid-tied panels, the installer will be adding two panels on the roof dedicated to battery charging.  Now I just have to wait…
Solar insolation in January

Mapping Minnesota’s solar resource

Boston, New York City, Denver, Cambridge and other cities have created solar potential maps to help their residents understand that solar photovoltaic systems are viable in dense urban areas, and to demonstrate the potential that exists on rooftops.

Of course, I had to try this myself.

Minnesota produces LiDAR data, which is basically micro-scale elevation data produced by flying a plane back and forth in a grid and shooting the ground with lasers a bajillion times.  Skilled/obsessive GIS users can clean from this data information that can be used to make a fairly accurate model of everything on the ground (buildings, trees, etc).  GIS software also makes it easy to produce daily, monthly or annual solar insolation maps.  By taking the position of the buildings and trees, knowing the latitude, and projecting how the sun moves across the sky throughout the year, the software calculates a total amount of solar radiation that will hit a point after shading, angle and other factors are taken into account.

Solar insolation in January
Solar insolation in January

After much tinkering, the Kingfield Solar Energy Potential map was born.  The extreme density of the LiDAR data limits how large an area I could process (there were 4.9 million individual data points in this one small section of Minneapolis), but you get the idea.  This map shows the area of each roof that might be appropriate for solar, how many panels could fit in that area, and an estimate of the annual production from those panels.

The Kingfield Solar Map
The Kingfield Solar Map

Some roofs are wholly inappropriate for solar, whether due to tree or building shading, orientation or size.  But there is significant potential.  If solar was installed on every appropriate piece of roof in this one-quarter square mile area, it would produce an estimated 2.2 megawatt hours of electricity each year, and avoid 2.9 million pounds of carbon dioxide emissions.

DSC02868

Counting every watt hour

This little device is an ethernet to wi-fi adapter. It connects my solar charge controller to my home wi-fi network so I can make fancy graphs.  It uses 1.2 watts per hour.  I know this because I measured its usage using a watt meter.  I do this with everything I power from the solar batteries.

I have a hunch that this is what solar does to you, makes you compulsive about energy use.  Even if (when?) I have a large grid-tied system, I imagine myself checking the daily output, and constantly thinking about how to reduce my usage to match.

On very cloudy days, this little thing has used over 45% of the energy produced by the panels.  I unplugged it.  For now, graphs only on special occasions.

Home solar: adding MPPT and marvelous data

DSC02865

As part of my plan for the eventual expansion of my off-grid solar energy system, I recently added a new charge controller with Maximum Power Point Tracking (MPPT).  Besides being much more efficient, this controller is capable of producing reams and reams of wondrous data, and is network-connected, meaning I can geek out on battery voltage and array current from anywhere in the house!  The charge controller I had was great, but it wouldn’t handle anything beyond a few more small panels.  Now I should be able to go all the way up to 750 watts of panels (my goal).  So, thanks Santa!

While installing the controller, I also took the opportunity to install a breaker box, which should bring me closer to code, and upgrade to larger diameter battery cable, which should reduce efficiency losses.

The MPPT advantage

MPPT is a fancy way of saying the charge controller is able to send significantly more energy to the batteries from the same panels.  How much more? After only a few days of testing, I estimate 40 – 60% more than the Pulse-Width Modulation (PWM) controller on days when the battery is low.  (If you want to know the details of how MPPT works, I found this explanation helpful.)

Here’s some actual data from my system which I think illustrates the MPPT advantage well:

1-5 plain graph

The blue line is the amps, or current, coming from the panels.  The red line shows the amps the controller is putting in to the battery.  It’s higher!  The magical MPPT doohicky converts excess voltage into amperage (remember, amps X volts = watts) so less of your panel’s potential is wasted.  On this particular day, I estimate the charge controller may have been able to wring an extra 100 – 150 watt-hours from the panels.

There are other interesting things going on here, so here’s a little annotation:

1-5 annotated graph

Here’s the next day, when the battery starts out the day almost totally full.  It was very sunny.

1-6 amps graph

The controller limits the array current and current to the battery significantly because the battery is almost fulled charged.  The gentle downward slope in the amperage is a function of battery charging called absorption.  Less current is pushed into the battery as it reaches capacity.

I can track hundreds of days of watt-hour production, so I’ll do another update when I can show some seasonal changes.  How I yearn for the days when the panels get more than 4 hours of sun per day!

Power surge

solar farm

My back yard solar farm has doubled in size to a massive 200 watts!

If you remember from the last post, the wooden frame was half empty (who built it like that?), and was feeling really lopsided without another panel.  The frame is now full (Amazon is a marvel of the modern age), so any further expansion will have to happen on the roof or elsewhere.

Untitled
Parallel wiring.

Under optimal conditions I think this will produce 480 watt-hours per day.  For reference, that’s about 60 percent of the power needed to run our chest freezer.  These panels are connected in parallel, meaning the voltage (12) is the same, but the amperage is doubled (to about 10 amps).  I ordered a cheap ammeter, which I’m excited to hook up so I can see real time results.

The last few weeks have been very cloudy, so I think output has been down.  The next week doesn’t look that great either.  When you’re a solar farmer, you start caring about the weather a lot more.

After adding some additional wiring, I now have access to a solar-powered power strip in the living room, rather than just having access in the basement where I could run an extension cord from the inverter.  Now I’m regularly running some lights and the stereo from the battery.  The cable modem and router are small, consistent loads, so I may move those downstairs to become battery-powered.  I’ve become somewhat obsessed about matching load to the production, since I don’t want to “waste” any electricity produced (and also don’t want to run my battery below 50%).

Stay tuned for another update when the ammeter arrives.

On estimating solar output and voltage drops

12.9 volts?! I want 18.9!
12.9 volts?! I want 18.9!

When I started tinkering with off-grid solar one of the first questions I asked myself was “how long is it going to take to charge this battery?” Or, similarly, “how much power will I produce in a day”?  Initially, the answer seemed easy: I’ve got a 100-watt panel, Minnesota gets about 4 hours of peak sun on average per day, so I’ll get 400 watt hours per day!  A 960 watt hour battery should be charged in two and a half days!

Wrong.  Way off.  Maybe more like 250 watt hours per day, and more like four days to fully charged.

I realized this quickly when attempting to charge a fully depleted battery.  In reality, it took into the fourth day for the charge controller to switch to battery maintenance mode (showing it was completely full).

Under perfect operating conditions and when grid-tied, you may actually get close to that nameplate 100 watts.  However, when your system is connected to a battery the voltage drops.  Many charge controllers (except for the really good expensive ones) will match the voltage of the panel to that of the battery to facilitate charging, which is almost always a lower voltage than the panels potential peak.  The rest of that potential is wasted.  So while my panel will produce 5.29 amps at 18.9 volts under optimum conditions (5.29 amps x 18.9 volts = 100 watts), when connected to my battery, it will probably only produce 5.29 amps at between 11 and 13 amps (5.29 amps x 12 volts = 63 watts).

Panels are built this way on purpose to make sure power can continue to flow to the battery even during overcast conditions when voltage may drop a little (gotta make sure that water flows downhill!).  Grid-tied panels don’t have this problem, since the grid can usually accommodate your voltage, and in a grid-tied system you’ll probably opt for one of the fancier MPPT controllers (see link above).

So, in summary, I’m probably getting 65 – 70% of my nameplate wattage (by design), and a realistic estimate for charging a fully-depleted 80 amp-hour battery from my 100 watt panel is 3.5 – 4 days.

Another takeaway for this amateur: it’s about amps, not watts.  The websites where you shop for panels always have the watts in large font, but the small print tells you the optimum operating current, or amps.  This number times hours of sun gives a much better estimate of the output (5.29 amps x 4 hours = 21 amp hours per day) for a battery-tied system.

Home solar update

Dead battery!
Dead battery!

The battery was totally dead this morning (11.4 volts) after about 16 hours powering the freezer.  The charge controller indicated the panel was charging the battery for about 4-5 of those hours, but it was extremely cloudy.  I turned off the inverter and reconnected the freezer to grid power (it’s nice to have a backup to the backup!)  After charging all day today, the battery is up to about 60%.  I hope I didn’t do any permanent damage to the battery.

My estimate of the charge time was pretty close, but my estimate of running time for the freezer was pretty far off.  I don’t think I calculated any loses from the inverter, which the internet tells me can be 15% or more.  It was also a hot day, hotter than when I measured my freezers usage initially, which could have had an impact. Next time I’ll definitely be measuring the total watt hours used (I forgot to hook up the meter) so I can try to estimate what was lost to the inverter.

One more day of charging before I do any more experimenting.